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KED-3400
Key entry device

KED-3400 is a combined key generator and key distribution device, developed around 1992 by Crypto AG (Hagelin) in Zug (Switzerland), for use in combination with the HC-3400 embedded encryption unit, such as used in the Ascom 1 SE-160 and SE-660 two-way FM mobile radios.

The device is housed in a die-cast aluminium enclosure that is nearly identical to that of the HC-5200 electronic message unit. It measures 22 x 11 x 3.5 cm and weights just under 1 kg.

The device is powered by a single 9V battery that is installed in a compartment at the bottom. The control panel has 26 rubber keys, a buzzer and a display with two lines of 40 character each. Keys can be generated by the built-in random number generator, but can also be entered manually on the keyboard. Once generated, the keys can be transferred to a compatible mobile crypto radio.
  
KED 3400 key entry device

In addition, they can be transferred to another KED-3400 unit for further key distribution. The device can hold up to 8 single keys, each of which is 32 hexadecimal digits long. Furthermore, it is possible to follow the so-called 3-KEY strategy, in which each device is given three keys, known as the past or expired key (E), the current or active key (A) and the future or spare key (S).

By default, the Active Key (A) is used, but by using the 3-KEY strategy, secure communication is also possible with devices that are still on the Expired Key (E) or are already on the new Spare Key (S). By giving each key a 3-digit ID, radios will automatically select the appropriate crypto key.

  1. Around 2000, the mobile radio division of Ascom was first taken over by Bosch and then by Motorola. The latter consolidated the trunking radio marked and then shut down the Ascom business.  More

KED 3400 key entry device Control panel KED-3400 seen from the left Connections at the left side Bottom view LEMO cable and sideways connector for SE-160 KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio
A
×
A
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KED 3400 key entry device
A
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Control panel
A
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KED-3400 seen from the left
A
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Connections at the left side
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Bottom view
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LEMO cable and sideways connector for SE-160
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KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio
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KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio

Controls
All controls of the KED-3400 are on the top surface of the device, as shown in the diagram below. The radio is powered by a single 9V block battery 1 that is installed behind a lid at the bottom. Press
ON
to turn the device ON. Press
ON
again at any moment to turn it OFF again. If no buttons are pressed, the device turns itself off after approximately one minute of inactivity.


At the top left is the 2 x 40 character liquid crystal display (LCD). The rest of the control panel is taken by the 26 rubber keys. The function of each key is printed on the key top. If a key has a second (shift) function, it is printed above it. They five keys below the LCD have no text on them. Their function will be shown on the display as and when appropriate. At the left side are two sockets, a 10-pin NF10 and a 6-pin LEMO, for connection to the device to be programmed.

  1. Remove the 9V battery if the device will be stored for a long period of time, in order to prevent damage caused by leaking batteries. Note that ALL batteries will eventually leak, even professional ones.

Control panel Connections at the left side Bottom view Battery compartment
B
×
B
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Control panel
B
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Connections at the left side
B
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Bottom view
B
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Battery compartment

 Full operating instructions
Operation
The HC-3400 can be used for a variety of functions, including:

Compatible devices
The following devices are known to be HC-3400 compatible:

Ascom SE-160 handheld radio Ascom SE-660 handheld radio CRYPTOVOX SE-580m based on Nokia Mobira hardware
SE-580
Transfer to another KED-3400 device KDD-3400 key distribution device
SE-160
The image on the right shows how the KED-3400 is connected to an SE-160 handheld radio. A sideways adapter is used to connect the 6-pin LEMO cable to side of the SE-160.

The sideways connector can be locked in place by fastening the large screw at the center, but as programming takes just a few seconds, it is also possible to press it firmly against the side of the radio. Once the two devices are connected, a few key-presses are needed to initiate a transfer.

 About the SE-160

  
KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio

SE-660
The image on the right shows how the KED-3400 is connected to an SE-660 mobile radio. An adapter with an RJ45 plug is used to connect the 6-pin LEMO cable to the microphone socket at the front panel of the SE-660.

Once the two devices are connected, a key transfer can be initiated with just a few key-presses. An I2C interface 1 is used for this.

 More about the SE-660
  
KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio

SE-580
The SE-580 was a portable radio, commonly used in trunking radio networks, such as Actionet, SpeedCom, RegioNet, Chekker and Traxys. It was built on the basis of a Nokia Mobira radio and could optionally be extended with a HC-3400 CRYPTOVOX encryption unit.

The radio was sold by Crypto AG (Hagelin) as the CRYPTOVOX SE-580 and is interoperable with the SE-160 and SE-660.

No picture available
  

KED-3400
The KED-3400 can also be used to transfer keys (and other parameters) to another KED-3400 unit, or to a KDD-3400 Key Distribution Device, for further distribution of the keys.

It is currently unknown which socket and which cable was used for a KED-to-KED transfer, but the standard LEMO cable that is used for a radio transfer, does not work.

No picture available
  

KDD-3400
In addition to the KED-3400, which was often too big for handling in the field, Crypto AG also produced the smaller and lightweight key distribution device KDD-3400. It provides an easy way of loading keys into a radio (filling).

The KDD-3400 is only capable of distributing bare keys. It can not be used for entering or generating keys, like the KED-3400. The KDD-3400 itself should be filled with a KED-3400.

No picture available
  

  1. I2C is also known as I2C and IIC.

Short data cable with a 6-pin male LEMO plug at either end Sideways adapter for SE-160 Sideways adapter for SE-160 LEMO cable and sideways connector for SE-160 Complete LEMO cable with SE-160 adapter KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio
SE-660 adapter cable KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio
C
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C
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Short data cable with a 6-pin male LEMO plug at either end
C
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Sideways adapter for SE-160
C
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Sideways adapter for SE-160
C
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LEMO cable and sideways connector for SE-160
C
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Complete LEMO cable with SE-160 adapter
C
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KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio
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KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio
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KED-3400 connection to SE-160 radio
C
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SE-660 adapter cable
C
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KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio
C
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KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio
C
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KED-3400 connection to SE-660 radio

Zeroize
In case of an emergency, all data stored in the CMOS RAM of the KED-3400 can be purged by pressing the buttons
ECY
and
simultaneously. This procedure is commonly known as zeroizing. After pressing the two buttons together, the display seeks for confirmation:


If you really want to delete all data from the KED-3400, press YES
9
. If you do not want to delete the keys, press NO
0
. Once the device is cleared, it can no longer be used to program any radios, until new data has been entered by the system manager (SYS-MAN).

Press these two buttons simultaneously to purge all data
Key distribution
For generating or entering keys, the user needs a password, as described here. This password is only required when accessing the SYS-MGR function (1). For distribution of keys to the radios, it is also possible to use the COURIER function. After switching ON, select COURIER, then SEND:





 Full operating instructions


Interior
The KED-3400 is housed in a strong die-cast aluminium enclosure, which is very similar to the one used for the HC-5200 electronic message unit, albeit with some small differences. The interior can be access by removing eight recessed screws from the bottom side of the device.

The interior is very similar to that of the HC-5200 with probably only the interface board and the firmware being different. It consists of a full-size flex-PCB that holds the keyboard (again, identical to that of the HC-5200), a large PCB and three smaller PCB plug-in or daughter cards.

The board at the top left holds the CPU (central processing unit), whilst the one at the top right holds the internal power supply unit (PSU). The board at the bottom right contains the interfaces for communication with the attached radios. An I2C interface is used for the SE-160 and SE-660.
  
Interior

Note the blue ½AA-size battery at the font edge. It is mounted to the larger main board, in a cut-out space of the interface board. It serves as a backup for the internal CMOS RAM (key) memory. As a result, the keys are retained even when the main 9V battery is exhausted or removed. The backup battery has to be replaced every five years. The reason for using CMOS RAM (rather than flash memory) is that the keys may have to be purged (zeroized) in case of a distress situation.

The main power for the device is provided by a single 9V block battery that is installed behind a removable lid at the bottom side. This battery should be removed when the unit is not used for a longer period if time, to avoid damage caused by leakage. Note that eventually all batteries, even professional ones, will leak. Luckily however, as the battery is held in a sealed compartment that is part of the bottom panel, it will not cause damage to the interior when it starts leaking.

Bottom view Battery compartment Interior Bottom view of the interior of the KED-3400 Backup battery CPU Internal wiring to the connectors Leaking battery
D
×
D
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Bottom view
D
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Battery compartment
D
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Interior
D
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Bottom view of the interior of the KED-3400
D
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Backup battery
D
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CPU
D
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Internal wiring to the connectors
D
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Leaking battery

Connections
NF-10 socket
The pinout of this socket is currently unknown. The socket is probably used for KED-to-KED cloning, for which a 10-way one-to-one wired cable should work. This has not yet been tested. The diagram below shows the pinout of the NF10 socket when looking into the socket.

  1. ?
  2. ?
  3. ?
  4. ?
  5. ?
  6. ?
  7. ?
  8. ?
  9. ?
  10. ?
LEMO socket
The 6-pin LEMO socket is used for transferring key material to the radio. In a standard transfer cable, only pins 1, 2 and 5 are wired for the IIC bus. The purpose of the other pins is currently unknown. The diagram below shows the pinout of the 6-pin female LEMO socket, when looking into the socket from the left side of the device.

  1. IIC Data (ZDA) · yellow
  2. IIC Clock (ZCL) · green
  3. not connected
  4. not connected
  5. Ground · brown
  6. Power input +12V (optional)
Parts
  • CAG-3400-01
    LEMO cable 40 cm
  • CAG-3400-03
    LEMO cable 1.5 m
  • CAG-3400-04
    Adapter for connection to SE-660
  • CAG-564.997-A
    Adapter for connection to SE-160
  • ?
    KED-KED cloning cable
Technical specifications
  • Number of keys
    8
  • Key length
    32 digits
  • Power supply
    Standard 9V block battery
  • Backup battery
    1/2 AA-size 3.6V, 0.95 Ah, Lithium Thionyl Chloride cell (internal)
Key types
  • E
    Expired (past)
  • A
    Active (current)
  • S
    Spare (future)
References
  1. Crypto AG, Company brochure, Crypto Products
    1992. Page 3.
Further information
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Crypto Museum. Created: Saturday 24 June 2017. Last changed: Friday, 07 July 2017 - 12:18 CET.
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