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Fake bolt
Concealment device

This ordinary-looking metal bolt is in fact a concealment device that can be used in espionage tradecraft as a so-called dead drop. Objects like this are commonly used by agents and their handlers to pass small objects without attacting attention from the enemy's security forces [1].
 
When closed, the device looks like an ordinary metal bolt that would attact no attention when found in, say, a toolbox in someone' shed. In reality however, this bolt has a secret storage compartment which can be used to hide small objects, such as money, cryptographic keys, frequency tables, secret contact information, instructions, or even a small computer chip.

In order to prevent its discovery, the removable head has reverse thread, which means that you have to turn it clockwise to get access to the container. An O-ring makes the bolt watertight.
  
Two tiny little OTP booklets hidden inside the hollow bolt

Devices like this were very popular during the Cold War, but are probably still used by spies today. The device shown here is a high-quality reproduction which was found on eBay. It is available in three different sizes and can not be distinguised from any ordinary metal bolt.
 
Commonly looking bolt which is actually a concealment device The head removed from the bolt Close-up of the head (with reverse thread) Head removed from the container Close-up of the head with its reverse thread Small message hidden inside the secret compartment inside a bolt Two tiny little OTP booklets hidden inside the hollow bolt

 
References
  1. Wikipedia, Dead drop
    Retrieved October 2014.

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Crypto Museum. Created: Monday 06 October 2014. Last changed: Sunday, 15 January 2017 - 09:00 CET.
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